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California Law SB-206 and the future of college sports

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  • California Law SB-206 and the future of college sports

    Name and likeness. Interesting.

  • #2
    Thoughts:
    1. College sports is more popular than minor league sports because of alma mater affiliation. Not because the athletics level is higher.
    2. All leagues benefit from and make rules to require some level of even playing field.
    3. The level playing field in college sports is of amateurism.
    4. Amateurism in the NCAA is window dressing, but it has been important to make fans feel like they are participating in a fair contest.
    If states go forward with allowing students to sell their image/likeness, the amount of money some students will get could be huge. I remember multiple huge yachts moored at Battle for Atlantis with big blue ā€œDā€ flags flying on them.

    The effect will be payments going from 50,000 under the table to 6 figures and public.

    When everyone knows that top teams have players making huge $$, and the pretense of an even playing field is gone, how long will interest stay where it is?

    Comment


    • #3
      'This is AJ Green, and when I'm not scoring 30 a night, I'm driving a Toyota from Dan Deery Toyota on University Avenue in Cedar Falls...'
      #MACtion

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by BCPanther View Post
        'This is AJ Green, and when I'm not scoring 30 a night, I'm driving a Toyota from Dan Deery Toyota on University Avenue in Cedar Falls...'
        Sure, that could happen. And while it wouldn't make him rich, it would be a nice bit of money to have.

        People seem to believe that any money an athlete receives from this would go into a pool and all student athletes would share in it equally. So A.J. would get as much as a golfer or a softball player. Once it's distributed it doesn't seem like a lot. Also any money an athlete receives may be taxable. I would guess most athletes are going to be claimed as dependents on their parent(s) returns but it may be enough where the student would have to file a return. I'm not sure that this would put an end to under the table payments. A high school player should still get money to come to a school and endorsement money - however much that would be.

        I would guess that the NCAA will figure out something that would apply to all the schools before any of these laws take effect. You can't have California athletes eligible for this and Iowa athletes ineligible. They would not dare make California schools off limits in regards to playing out of state teams or for post-season play.
        "And immediately, (P'Allen Stinnett's) Facebook status was spouting vulgarities towards the university."

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        • #5
          Originally posted by CincyPanther88 View Post
          People seem to believe that any money an athlete receives from this would go into a pool and all student athletes would share in it equally.
          I don't understand the logic behind that. Then again, I haven't read the new Cali law (nor do I feel like playing lawyer enough to sift through a bunch of tedious legal jargon)

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by vbfan19 View Post
            Originally posted by CincyP
            $ in pool; players share
            I don't understand the logic behind that. Then again, I haven't read the new Cali law (nor do I feel like playing lawyer enough to sift through a bunch of tedious legal jargon)
            Well, the logic of it is that everyone is working just as hard. (But of course, how hard you work is not the typical or fairest factor in pay.)

            I suppose it would be like waiters in a restaurant splitting tips.

            And it could be an extreme version of salary cap. The best NFL players are limited in their negotiations by salary cap.
            The purpose is that a team with more fans and $$$ can't just pay all their players double what the rest of the league pays - it wouldn't be a fair league if they could. Such a thing could force a more even playing field on the NCAA teams.

            On the other hand, CincyP, I have not read that suggested anywhere. If Zion's big smile earns him $100,000, that's a lot. BUT if he has to share it with all the 4,511 D1 men's Bball players, he'll only put $22 in his pocket. And if you include men's and women's D1 BB, then he'll get about 11 bucks. And "all Student Athletes" would mean he probably doesn't even get a dollar, which seems ridiculous. Will he take the time for the photo shoot?

            - This brings up the question of who gets to be in the pool of sharing. The big money schools will want to limit it to P5 or something. But that seems like demanding an recruiting advantage over their peer institutions. Gonna be a mess.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by sivert View Post
              Well, the logic of it is that everyone is working just as hard. (But of course, how hard you work is not the typical or fairest factor in pay.)

              I suppose it would be like waiters in a restaurant splitting tips.

              And it could be an extreme version of salary cap. The best NFL players are limited in their negotiations by salary cap.
              The purpose is that a team with more fans and $$$ can't just pay all their players double what the rest of the league pays - it wouldn't be a fair league if they could. Such a thing could force a more even playing field on the NCAA teams.

              On the other hand, CincyP, I have not read that suggested anywhere. If Zion's big smile earns him $100,000, that's a lot. BUT if he has to share it with all the 4,511 D1 men's Bball players, he'll only put a few dollars in his pocket. And if you include men's and women's D1 BB, then he'll get about 11 bucks. And "all Student Athletes" would mean he probably doesn't even get a dollar, which seems ridiculous. Will he take the time for the photo shoot?

              - This brings up the question of who gets to be in the pool of sharing. The big money schools will want to limit it to P5 or something. But that seems like demanding an recruiting advantage over their peer institutions. Gonna be a mess.
              What I was suggesting is that any money a student-athlete receives from endorsements he shares with all the athletes at his school not every D1 athlete. However if it were shared with every D1 athlete, it may only be worth $22 to him but he's not the only one getting paid. Guys at Kansas, Michigan State, North Carolina, etc will also get paid and put that money in either a larger pool (all D1 athletes) or a smaller one (all athletes at just the one school.) I'm just speculating what lay people are suggesting what might happen. I have no clue how it's going to turn out but I expect the NCAA to have some kind of rule so this happens across the board instead of one state allowing it and another state not having it.

              Personally, I'm all about the free market. If, for example, the O.P. wants A.J. Green to do a commercial for them and they throw some money his way, he should keep it all or do with it as he pleases.

              A few years ago, someone in IIRC the O'Bannon case suggested that players could earn money off their likenesses but it would be put in a trust and they would only get it after they were no longer a student. The NCAA said no.
              "And immediately, (P'Allen Stinnett's) Facebook status was spouting vulgarities towards the university."

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