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ISU releases Jacob Park from scholarship

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  • ISU releases Jacob Park from scholarship

    was reading an article about former Cyclone QB Jacob Park being granted a scholarship release:
    https://www.desmoinesregister.com/st...hip/985609001/


    Found this clause interesting:
    Iowa State placed the same restrictions it usually places on scholarship releases. He has permission to talk to anyone except schools in the Big 12 Conference; the University of Iowa, Northern Iowa and Drake and anyone on Iowa State future schedules.
    the restriction on going to other Big 12 schools is fairly standard, and I understand Iowa, UNI and future opponents. But Drake being on the restricted list surprises me. Why would ISU care if a player wanted to transfer to a non-scholarship football team?

    Do players always have to obtain a scholarship release before transfering, even when moving down to a lower subdivision (or D2)? What about graduate transfers?

  • #2
    I assumed it was a form letter used for all sports. Note they didn't list the teams on future schedules. Outside of Iowa/UNI/big 12, there can't be many on the schedule. They could have listed them if they put any thought in to it.

    Comment


    • #3
      Players always must get a release if they wish to be on scholarship at another school. Schools can restrict how they want, and a player can appeal.

      Conference teams being restricted is normal, but not always the hard rule.
      Close rivals in another conference are fairly normal
      The FCS one is strange in this case. Park would be gone by the time UNI and ISU played again in 2019. Outside of a "he'll give them secrets a year in advance" or a PR reason I can't imagine why that is an issue.

      Drake is real confusing. Drake doesn't have scholarships. They can't restrict him from taking a scholarship at Drake because they don't offer them.

      Honestly, he can still go to any team on the restricted list, he just couldn't have a scholarship there. He could play for Iowa, Kansas, Kansas State, etc... it would just be as a "walk-on" paying his own way.

      Grad transfers are different in that they aren't really transfers. They've graduated from the school they were at. They can go where ever the hell they want and their old school can't stop them. They are no longer a student there. The only real rule on grad transfers is that the school they are "transferring" to must have a grad program that the school they are leaving does not offer/have an equivalent of.

      According to his roster bio Jacob was a liberal studies major - general studies most other places. That's....that's the "I didn't come here to play school"/"I'm only here because I was told I have to go to college" major. Anyway...so let's find a bit of a better example.

      Jordan Ashton graduated Iowa State with a pre-business major. He could not have come to UNI (or anywhere) to get his MBA and qualified under the grad transfer rule. Iowa State offers a MBA. If he wanted his MBA the NCAA would go "Then get it at Iowa State". Iowa State offers 117 masters level programs. UNI offers 52. UNI has a program that is useful in grad transfer situations - and honestly a ton of athletes major in it due to it not being overly stressing academically and is fairly universal to get into coaching - with Leisure, You, and Human Services.UNI offers it undergrad and grad. Iowa State offers Human Development and Family Services, which UNI offers as undergrad. The two programs (undergrad and grad level...HDFS/LYHS...are very similar in terms of core material covering the development of children and families. They split in HDFS going to a non-profit field work role and LYHS going into an administrative and development role. That little difference is what allowed him to get a grad release.

      I'm torn on the idea of a grad transfer. Very few of those who take the transfer actually finish their masters degree. Almost every MA/MS is at least a 2 year program. To fit 36 grad hours into one year, on top of basketball, is damn near impossible. Schedule wise I'm not even sure it's feasible from a normal stand point. I get it, use the loophole and all that. I'm just not sure the rule is being used as intended anymore
      Last edited by clenz; 12-29-2017, 09:38 AM.
      "People will talk about getting into the playoffs - don't give a ****. This isn't about just getting to the playoffs. Bull**** programs care about just getting to the playoffs."
      -A twist on Matt Campbell getting Iowa State bowl eligible.

      Comment


      • #4
        The "they are no longer a student there" argument doesn't make sense, as that would apply to ANY transfer (barring some kid taking classes at two different colleges at the same time). But I imagine there are NCAA regulations that deal with what schools can and cannot restrict in that aspect (thus the former school couldn't stop the kid from transferring, but unless the proper protocol was followed, the kid would not be granted NCAA eligibility to participate in the sport)

        And I take it that once a student athelete completes their undergrad degree, then any graduate academics no longer effect the APR or other such statistics that the NCAA uses (or does a grad transfer not completing their masters still negatively effect the teams rating?)

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by vbfan19 View Post
          The "they are no longer a student there" argument doesn't make sense, as that would apply to ANY transfer (barring some kid taking classes at two different colleges at the same time). But I imagine there are NCAA regulations that deal with what schools can and cannot restrict in that aspect (thus the former school couldn't stop the kid from transferring, but unless the proper protocol was followed, the kid would not be granted NCAA eligibility to participate in the sport)

          And I take it that once a student athelete completes their undergrad degree, then any graduate academics no longer effect the APR or other such statistics that the NCAA uses (or does a grad transfer not completing their masters still negatively effect the teams rating?)
          It does make sense as by graduating the scholarship is ended and eligibility at that school is ended, by transferring the scholarship is not, nor is the eligibility at said school

          "People will talk about getting into the playoffs - don't give a ****. This isn't about just getting to the playoffs. Bull**** programs care about just getting to the playoffs."
          -A twist on Matt Campbell getting Iowa State bowl eligible.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by clenz View Post
            I'm torn on the idea of a grad transfer. Very few of those who take the transfer actually finish their masters degree. Almost every MA/MS is at least a 2 year program. To fit 36 grad hours into one year, on top of basketball, is damn near impossible. Schedule wise I'm not even sure it's feasible from a normal stand point. I get it, use the loophole and all that. I'm just not sure the rule is being used as intended anymore
            Sports Illustrated had an article on this topic in August of 2017. The article talked about how low the graduation rate is for student-athletes who make this choice. This low graduation rate applies to both men's and women's Athletics. I believe, for example, that women's volleyball is extremely low in their graduation rate of students who are working on their advanced degree.

            The most prominent example of the graduate rule is Russell Wilson. Wilson only spent one year at the University of Wisconsin football program before being drafted by the Seattle Seahawks.

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