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Eastern Washington Faculty Recommends Cut Backs or Elimination of Athletics

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  • Eastern Washington Faculty Recommends Cut Backs or Elimination of Athletics

    https://www.inlander.com/spokane/ewu...t?oid=19099082

  • #2
    In other news for faculty members...

    Water is still wet.
    ​​​​
    These type of reports are not commissioned, written, or released unless you know what the conclusion will be at the start.

    Comment


    • #3
      Interesting story. I haven't had time to read it through yet.

      But here's a related story that really surprised me on the University of Montana. Their enrollment has dropped dramatically since 2011...like 45% undergrad. Meanwhile Montana State is down just slightly.

      Likely the federal investigation of their handling of sexual assaults cases in 2011 had a very negative impact.

      I had no idea they were struggling this bad.

      https://missoulian.com/news/local/un...87dd9c251.html

      Winning is more fun than losing.

      Comment


      • #4
        yes, there will always be faculty that are anti-athletics.
        but it is also a fact that there is less and less student interest in athletics (i.e. attending games, etc.) and sporting event attendance is down in general at many (or possibly even most) schools, and of course, the costs of running an athletic program continues to rise.
        I could see more and more schools taking a harder look as to whether the expenditures needed to maintain athletics are really worth it.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Blue42 View Post
          Interesting story. I haven't had time to read it through yet.

          But here's a related story that really surprised me on the University of Montana. Their enrollment has dropped dramatically since 2011...like 45% undergrad. Meanwhile Montana State is down just slightly.

          Likely the federal investigation of their handling of sexual assaults cases in 2011 had a very negative impact.

          I had no idea they were struggling this bad.

          https://missoulian.com/news/local/un...87dd9c251.html
          Montana is *the* extreme example, but not alone.

          Overall, on-campus enrollments are trending down (public, private, for-profit). At most schools with growth or holding steady, it is online/distance credits that are keeping them in place.

          Plus, lots of talk in higher ed of the oncoming "Cliff of 2025."
          "Well, that escalated quickly."

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by vbfan19 View Post
            yes, there will always be faculty that are anti-athletics.
            but it is also a fact that there is less and less student interest in athletics (i.e. attending games, etc.) and sporting event attendance is down in general at many (or possibly even most) schools, and of course, the costs of running an athletic program continues to rise.
            I could see more and more schools taking a harder look as to whether the expenditures needed to maintain athletics are really worth it.
            I think all that needs to be taken into context. Attendance is down in all sports both professional and college. No one is quite sure why. Some say ticket prices, concessions, parking, etc. are too high. Others think that the easy access to games on TV are a reason.

            Running an athletic program isn't cheap but it never was. Fortunately for some programs the TV money is so great they can afford new weight rooms, etc. Most programs are not that fortunate and those are the programs that are in jeopardy.

            There's always been a segment of faculties that have been against all the money athletic programs receive. While they do have a point it isn't cut and dried. Kids look up to athletes. I see the pictures after UNI games where the players are posing for pictures and signing autographs for kids. That means a lot to kids. If things like that motivate kids to go to that school that's a good thing.
            "And immediately, (P'Allen Stinnett's) Facebook status was spouting vulgarities towards the university."

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by ronfitch View Post

              Montana is *the* extreme example, but not alone.

              Overall, on-campus enrollments are trending down (public, private, for-profit). At most schools with growth or holding steady, it is online/distance credits that are keeping them in place.

              Plus, lots of talk in higher ed of the oncoming "Cliff of 2025."
              Without Googling it, what is the “Cliff of 2025”? Guessing it’s roughly the year that college age kids see a large drop in percentage of the population, thereby reducing the pool of potential enrollees?

              I’ve heard similar fears about real estate, where once the boomers die off the housing market will have a big glut of supply with fewer buyers left to back fill the departed seasoned citizens.

              Comment


              • #8
                If you’re going to be a high school senior in 2025 and want to go to college, you may have a lot of interested takers.

                The report “projects the number of high school graduates to remain flat from now until 2023, with a slight increase, followed by a dramatic decrease, after 2025 from about 3.5 million graduates per year to about three million”

                “Projections shows that the population of high school students has been declining in some regions since 2013. For instance, New England will see a 10 percent decrease in high school graduates from 2013 to 2023. The Midwest, Mid-Atlantic and Pacific Coast regions are all showing declines. Numbers of graduates in southern states remain flat. States such as Texas, Utah and Idaho will see increases in high school graduates as those states see population growth from people moving into those areas.”

                Maybe the faculty are right to request looking at sports budgets and having them be either more self sufficient or face serious cuts so the universities can survive with the declining enrollment. This also may lead to more school sports dropping down a division from where they are currently at in order to survive.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Basically, what Havok58 writes.

                  The most common figure I have seen/heard the past year is 15% drop off between 2025 and 2029 overall, in part predicted because of the marked decline in births in 2008 and in the years immediately after, rising tuition rates, students looking for different education models, etc. But there has been a decline in overall numbers for the past eight years, already.

                  The "Sixty-Year Curriculum" is gaining attention. I have seen that credited to Cal-Irvine. School administrators are looking at everything (well, most everything) these days.
                  "Well, that escalated quickly."

                  Comment

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